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The Agonizing, Complicated, Lingering Questions of Shaken Baby Syndrome

Ten years after Matthew Eappen's death - for which nanny Louise Woodward was convicted of involuntary manslaughter - a doctor who treated the infant has reversed his position on the case. Why is so much still unknown about shaken baby syndrome?

On October 30, 1997, the jury found Louise Woodward guilty of second-degree murder. The judge later reduced the charge to involuntary manslaughter.
On October 30, 1997, the jury found Louise Woodward guilty of second-degree murder. The judge later reduced the charge to involuntary manslaughter. (Ted Fitzgerald / AP File Photo) Ted Fitzgerald / AP File Photo
By MARY CARMICHAEL
February 11, 2007

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On February 9, 1997, suffering from massive brain trauma after apparently being shaken and slammed against a hard surface, 8½-month-old Matthew Eappen died at Children’s Hospital Boston. It was the beginning of a story that would capture the nation’s attention and eventually see the dramatic release of au pair Louise Woodward, first convicted of second-degree murder, then let go on ... (Full article: 3984 words)

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