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Kai Siegbahn, 89; shared Nobel Prize in physics in 1981

Kai Siegbahn (left) received the Nobel in physics from Sweden's King Carl Gustaf. Kai Siegbahn (left) received the Nobel in physics from Sweden's King Carl Gustaf. (jan collsioo/associated press/1981 file)

STOCKHOLM -- Kai Siegbahn, who shared the 1981 Nobel Prize in physics, died July 20. He was 89.

Dr. Siegbahn, whose father, Manne, was awarded the 1924 Nobel Prize in physics, received the award for his contribution to the development of high-resolution electron spectroscopy, a technique for analyzing materials through an examination of their electrons.

Dr. Siegbahn died of a heart attack at his summer cabin in southern Sweden, said his wife, Anna Brita.

He shared the Nobel prize with Dutch-born Nicolaas Bloembergen of Harvard University and Arthur Leonard Schawlow of Stanford University, who were cited for their contribution to the development of another form of spectroscopy that uses lasers.

Dr. Siegbahn was a professor and head of the physics department at the University of Uppsala since 1954.

He was a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, Royal Society of Science, Royal Academy of Arts and Science of Uppsala, and the Royal Physiographical Society of Lund.

Dr. Siegbahn retired in 1984 but continued visiting the Angstrom Laboratory at the University of Uppsala.

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