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Charles Comiskey II, 81; helped shape White Sox pennant team

HINSDALE, Ill. -- Charles Albert "Chuck" Comiskey II, grandson and namesake of the Chicago White Sox founder and a former front-office executive and co-owner during the "Go Go Sox" years in the 1950s, has died. He was 81.

Mr. Comiskey died in his sleep Sunday at his home, according to a funeral home, citing a statement from his family. Further details on his death were not disclosed.

While his family name is one of the best known in Chicago sports history, Mr. Comiskey left his own mark in helping to successfully remake the team en route to its first American League pennant in 40 years in 1959.

Fans attending Monday's game between the White Sox and Tampa Bay at US Cellular Park, formerly Comiskey Park, observed a moment of silence.

White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf credited Mr. Comiskey with playing an important role in developing the resurgent White Sox teams of the '50s during his stint in the front office.

"Chuck represented the great tradition of Comiskey family ownership of the White Sox," Reinsdorf said in a statement. "A friend to many of us and a tremendously nice guy, I will always recall his excitement and joy when we won the World Series in 2005. It was an honor for the organization to present him with a World Series championship ring."

Born in Chicago, Mr. Comiskey grew up on the South Side and was 7 years old when his grandfather Charlie Comiskey, who founded the White Sox in 1901, died.

Mr. Comiskey joined the family business and was named vice president in 1948 before going on to be co-general manager with John Rigney from 1956-58 and club president from 1957-59, preceding Bill Veeck in that job.

Mr. Comiskey later got involved in real estate and also owned a taxi company.

He leaves his wife of 57 years, Donna Jo; two daughters, Colleen Kelley and Patti Slaga ; two sons, Charles III and Francis; and seven grandchildren.

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