THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Study finds a high rate of silent stroke

Email|Print|Single Page| Text size + By
Reuters / June 30, 2008

CHICAGO - Routine brain scans in a group of middle-aged people showed that 10 percent had suffered a stroke without knowing it, raising their risk for further strokes and memory loss, US researchers said Thursday.

People with atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heart beat in people over 65, had more than twice the rate of these silent strokes, they said.

Silent cerebral infarctions or SCIs are brain injuries caused by a blood clot that interrupts blood flow to the brain.

"The findings reinforce the need for early detection and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors in midlife," Dr. Sudha Seshadri of Boston University School of Medicine and colleagues wrote in the journal Stroke. "This is especially true since SCIs have been associated with an increased risk of incident stroke and cognitive impairment."

The researchers based their findings on routine magnetic resonance imaging or MRI scans from about 2,000 people with an average age of 62.

They were the children of participants in the long-running Framingham study - a study of the health and habits of nearly an entire town in Massachusetts. People in this so-called Framingham Offspring Study had medical exams every four to eight years.

Brain scans of these people found that 10.7 percent had a stroke even though they showed no stroke symptoms. Of these, 84 percent had only a single lesion in the brain.

The researchers then looked back to their medical records to see if these people had a risk profile that might predict a stroke.

What they found was that atrial fibrillation more than doubled the risk of silent stroke. In atrial fibrillation, the heart's two upper chambers do not pump effectively enough to empty properly, leaving blood to pool and raising the risk of blood clots.

Other factors that increased the risk of silent stroke included high levels of blood homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid found in the blood; carotid artery disease; high blood pressure and especially high systolic blood pressure - the top number in the blood pressure reading.

  • Email
  • Email
  • Print
  • Print
  • Single page
  • Single page
  • Reprints
  • Reprints
  • Share
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Comment
 
  • Share on DiggShare on Digg
  • Tag with Del.icio.us Save this article
  • powered by Del.icio.us
Your Name Your e-mail address (for return address purposes) E-mail address of recipients (separate multiple addresses with commas) Name and both e-mail fields are required.
Message (optional)
Disclaimer: Boston.com does not share this information or keep it permanently, as it is for the sole purpose of sending this one time e-mail.