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Talking turkey about death

Bloggers urge a holiday confab on terminal care

Alexandra Drane (left) launched a campaign to spur discussion of end-of-life wishes after her sister-in-law Rosaria Vandenberg died at 32. The family defied medical advice and brought Rosaria home to die. Alexandra Drane (left) launched a campaign to spur discussion of end-of-life wishes after her sister-in-law Rosaria Vandenberg died at 32. The family defied medical advice and brought Rosaria home to die. (Josh Reynolds for The Boston Globe)
By Kay Lazar
Globe Staff / November 26, 2008

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When Rosaria Vandenberg lay unconscious in the hospital, a malignant brain tumor stealing her life, her brother decided to overrule doctors' advice and bring her home to die. He believed, but wasn't sure, that this was what she would have wanted. The truth is, when she was conscious, her family had never asked. (Full article: 1142 words)

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