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In the experience of Trayvon Martin’s 19-year-old friend testifying in George Zimmerman’s trials, Boston teens hear echoes of their own lives

Christ-Roberte Julmice (left) Bruce Maiben, Sinain Joseph, and Daysra Robinson were among the teens in a group at ABCD Center in Dorchester who offered their views following Geroge Zimmerman’s trial in the death of Trayvon Martin.
Christ-Roberte Julmice (left) Bruce Maiben, Sinain Joseph, and Daysra Robinson were among the teens in a group at ABCD Center in Dorchester who offered their views following Geroge Zimmerman’s trial in the death of Trayvon Martin. Credit: Essdras M Suarez/Globe Staff

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Two women separated by geography and generations. Two women separated by experience and expectations.

A teen and an adult. One summoned to testify in a Florida courtroom, the other to listen. And even though the two were physically close during two days, they remained worlds apart.

It is this disconnect between juror and witness, one layered with issues of race and class, that underscores the varying reactions to last week’s acquittal of George Zimmerman by a Florida jury in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. The case has made young people reflect on how they are seen and heard — or misinterpreted — and it is a divide that teens in Boston say they know all too well.

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