Sections
Shortcuts

Civic doors opening for Latinos

English instructor Helio Regis helps Ibere Menezes, Maria Medeiros, and Maria Isabel at the Marlborough Senior Center.
English instructor Helio Regis helps Ibere Menezes, Maria Medeiros, and Maria Isabel at the Marlborough Senior Center.Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff

This is a summary. To read the whole story subscribe to BostonGlobe.com

Between 2000 and 2010, nearly every community in Massachusetts saw its Latino population increase. Only six communities out of 351 in the state had Latino populations that stayed the same, and in just 12, Latino populations fell.

And around the state, towns and cities are beginning to change with their populations.

In Salem, the city recently announced it would hire a part-time Latino affairs coordinator to help foster connections between Latinos and city government.

In Marlborough, the senior center has started English and exercise classes designed to bring in Brazilians who live in the community.

In North Andover, the children’s room of the library began stocking books like “Buenas Noches Luna” — “Good Night Moon” — and other Spanish or bilingual titles.

Full story for BostonGlobe.com subscribers.

Get the full story with unlimited access to BostonGlobe.com.

Just 99 cents for four weeks.

Sections
Shortcuts

Share