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Satellite trackers follow migrating osprey

Rob Bierregaard prepares to release a banded juvenile male osprey last month.
Rob Bierregaard prepares to release a banded juvenile male osprey last month.Photos by Mark Lorenz for the Boston Globe

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GLOUCESTER — Rob Bierregaard was in Gloucester and Essex recently, catching and tagging birds of prey on salt marsh land owned by the Essex County Greenbelt Association.

A distinguished visiting research professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Bierregaard is a leading expert on the osprey, sometimes referred to as a sea hawk or fish eagle.

He installed a solar-powered GPS transmitter on both of the two juvenile male birds he captured, to track their southward migration that will begin in September.

The two were the first birds he had banded on the North Shore.

The banding was part of the Greenbelt’s osprey program that has been expanded significantly this year, said Dave Rimmer, director of land stewardship for the nonprofit conservation group.

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