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Hazing allegations continue at summer athletic camps

Many high school sports coaches are now saying what any parent already knows: In an overnight setting with a group of teenagers, it is nearly impossible to supervise them at all times.
Many high school sports coaches are now saying what any parent already knows: In an overnight setting with a group of teenagers, it is nearly impossible to supervise them at all times.istockphoto

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The hazing allegations were shocking and the details explicit: While attending a summer camp intended to help build team unity in August, three Somerville High School junior varsity soccer players forced their way into a cabin, singled out a freshman, and raped him with a broomstick, a state prosecutor told a court earlier this month.

In Chelmsford, police are investigating about a half-dozen members of the high school football team, after an alleged hazing that occurred while they attended a summer camp last month in Moultonborough, N.H.

And in Northbridge, four high school football players last month allegedly pressured a freshman to drink urine.

Some 30 years ago, it was a ritual for high school football teams in Eastern Massachusetts to send their squads away to overnight summer camps. But a string of hazings persuaded most athletic directors to end the practice. And after recent accusations of alleged hazing at camps, some of the schools that still send kids to summer camps are reconsidering.

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