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Casino mogul husting door-to-door for votes in Leominster

David Cordish pitched his proposed slots parlor in Leominster to still-undecided resident Cheryl Morrill on Saturday.
David Cordish pitched his proposed slots parlor in Leominster to still-undecided resident Cheryl Morrill on Saturday. Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe

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LEOMINSTER — The richest guy Cheryl Morrill ever met showed up unannounced in the middle of her weekend yard work, eager to change her mind about the gambling industry.

“Maybe it would help with your taxes when we’re paying $4 million per year?” suggested David Cordish, a slim, 73-year-old with a Hollywood-white smile, pitching plans by the Cordish Companies to build a slot parlor in Leominster.

It is one of Cordish’s go-to arguments for the project, which the chairman of the 100-year-old Baltimore firm and its real estate empire delivered personally on Saturday, house after house, like a candidate for city office.

Still undecided, Morrill, 65, was impressed to learn later she may had just met her first billionaire.

“God love him,” she gushed. “That’s why he has such pretty teeth.”

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