Car crashes into South Boston real estate office; driver suffers minor injuries

A man was taken to Massachusetts General Hospital with minor injuries after he crashed into a real estate office on East Broadway in South Boston this morning, according to officials.

At least one person was inside the Jack Conway & Co. Realtor’s office at the time of the crash, but was not injured, according to Steve MacDonald, fire department spokesman.

Boston police officers and firefighters responded at around 9:35 a.m. to the scene.

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MacDonald said the man was parked in the Rite Aid Pharmacy parking lot on 710 East Broadway when his car traveled across the street, over a guardrail, and into the real estate office.

When firefighters arrived at the scene, the driver was still inside the vehicle and he was conscious, said MacDonald.

The cause for the crash was unclear, and Boston police were investigating, according to MacDonald.

After the driver was taken to the hospital, firefighters called the city’s inspectional services to determine if the car could be removed without the building collapsing.

“The determination was made that we could safely remove the car,” said MacDonald.

Firefighters placed support beams in the damaged wall and a tow truck then removed the vehicle from the structure, leaving a hole about 15 by 10 feet, said MacDonald.

Mike Foley, a realty agent at Jack Conway & Co. Realtors, said he was inside the office building when the crash occurred.

“I was in the office, in this section,” Foley said pointing at the cubicles on the opposite side of the building from the accident. “All of a sudden, I heard this big bang, and the whole building shook.”

He said he ran out on the street and encountered a friend, who told him that a car going in reverse from across the street had smashed into the building. Foley hurried over to the right side of the building and saw a vehicle jutting out of the wall.

“I couldn’t see anything because of the rubble,” he said. “There was a guy sitting in the car, and he was awake and responsive.”

The driver had plowed into the office’s conference room, which was empty at the time.

Foley said fumes from the car’s exhaust entered into the office, but he was thankful there had been no gasoline spillage.

He said he believed the driver was not badly injured.

“It’s amazing nobody was hurt, from across the street, to the parking lot, it’s just amazing,” Foley said.

Several other employees came to the scene within a couple hours of the crash to see the damages.

“The car’s bumper was at the back wall,” said Al Becker, vice president of marketing and operations for the agency while standing near the entrance to the conference room. He showed his co-workers cellphone pictures of the vehicle—a Mercury Grand Marquis—inside the room.

“My buddy texted me, saying ‘Dude, there is a car in your office,’ ” said Chris Curran, a regional lending manager for the company, who had stopped by to check out the damages on his way to today’s Bruins game.

His brother, Fran Curran, the realty agency’s South Boston office manager, said the hole would need to be boarded up, and the building’s electrical units were being examined as a safety precaution.

“Then we start cleaning up,” he said, looking at the conference room which was littered with pieces of ripped up insulation and piles of broken furniture, including chairs and a wooden table.