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Walsh Addresses Lockdown Criticism During Live Web Broadcast

Mayor Marty Walsh makes his St.Patrick's Day announcement at City Hall Plaza. Josh Reynolds for The Boston Globe (Metro, irons)
Mayor Marty Walsh makes his St.Patrick's Day announcement at City Hall Plaza. Josh Reynolds for The Boston Globe (Metro, irons) Josh Reynolds for The Boston Globe

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh discussed the city’s response to the Boston Marathon bombings during a live segment on The Huffington Post Monday afternoon.

Host Marc Lamont Hill asked Walsh about criticism over the April 19 lockdown as police searched for the bombers. Hill pointed to a 2013 piece in Israeli newspaper Haaretz that called the lockdown a “resounding triumph” for the bombers.

Walsh noted that he was not yet in office during last year’s bombing and manhunt, but thought the city did the right thing.

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“If I were the mayor, looking back a year later, I would have done the same thing,” said Walsh. “There was a lot of fear in the city at the time.”

Walsh said that while the city will remember those who were killed or injured, the fear has abated and the looking forward to bringing the race back to Boylston street.

“What Boston has really fed off over the last year is the strength of the survivors and the families who lost loved ones,” said Walsh. “Their courage and their strength is incredible and Boston has really fed off of that.”

Walsh said Tuesday’s memorial at the marathon’s finish line will serve as a moment of reflection.

“There’s some sadness around it, but tomorrow is a day of healing. It’s really a day for the families who lost people and the survivors who lost limbs and everything else that was taken away from them a year ago,” he said.

Hill asked how a city like Boston could prepare for a new attack when it would likely differ from the previous bombings.

“In the United States, when there is a terror attack, the follow-up safety precautions that are taken are often in response to the previous attack,” said Hill. “What do we do in the likely case that if there were another attack, it would be in a different form?”

“This is not the first public event we’ve had since the marathon in Boston,” Walsh responded. “I’m not anticipating anything, but we have all the safety precautions in place so people can feel safe on Monday.”

Hill asked about the potential of Marblehead native Shalane Flanagan winning the women’s race on Marathon Monday.

“We’re a city of champions and we’re used to winning,” said Walsh. “You never know what happens on Marathon Monday.”

Scalese can be reached at roberto.scalese@globe.com or via Twitter @BertoScalese.

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