Gov. Deval Patrick holds a Watertown baseball shirt given to him by city Police chief Edward Deveau at The Watertown Police Finish Strong 5k race held during the one-year anniversary of the capture of the alleged Boston Marathon bomber and the shootout that killed his brother.
Gov. Deval Patrick holds a Watertown baseball shirt given to him by city Police chief Edward Deveau at The Watertown Police Finish Strong 5k race held during the one-year anniversary of the capture of the alleged Boston Marathon bomber and the shootout that killed his brother.
John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe

Gov. Deval Patrick is assuring Bostonians that tomorrow’s 118th Boston Marathon will strike the right balance between enhanced security and maintaining the festivity’s “family feel”.

It will be “very safe,” he told CBS’s “Face the Nation” Sunday:

“Somebody said it may be the safest place in America tomorrow,” he continued. “But I will say that we’ve tried to strike a balance between enhanced security and preserving the family feel of this day.”

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The governor added there were no specific threats identified by intelligence experts, but that officials are still taking the day’s security seriously.

“We’re not taking that as a sign to stand down,” he said.

Patrick said he couldn’t discuss some of the precautions taken by officials, but noted a “considerable” police presence would be on-scene, including some “strategically placed” tactical units along the route.

Spectators will also be subject to possible bag searches and other heightened restrictions in some sensitive areas along the raceway.

Asked about lingering security concerns following last week’s “suspicious package” detonation near the Boylston Street finish line, Patrick praised first responders for their diligence in the episode and said he remained “quite confident” a similar incident would not occur Monday.

You can watch the full interview here:

Last week, former NYPD Chief Ray Kelly told ABC’s “This Week” that he fears a “copycat event” at this year’s race, but said local officials did all they could to secure the 26.2-mile course.

“You can do everything you can do to reduce the risk, but in a free and open society you can’t totally eliminate it,” Kelly said.