Geroge L. Beal was arrested and charged with OUI after a fellow driver -- who Beal side-swiped -- called police to report the crime.
Geroge L. Beal was arrested and charged with OUI after a fellow driver -- who Beal side-swiped -- called police to report the crime.
Hingham Police Department

If you see something, say something.

For years now, that phrase has been associated with suspicious packages that had been left unattended.

But Tuesday’s Supreme Court ruling that police can legally stop vehicles that are apparently driving recklessly or drunkenly based on an anonymous tip redefines what that certain “something” is.

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The AP reported:

The justices voted 5-4 Tuesday to uphold a traffic stop in northern California in which officers subsequently found marijuana in the vehicle. The officers themselves did not see any evidence of reckless driving.

For Hingham police, who early Sunday morning were notified of a potential drunk driver on Route 128 via a phone call, the ruling couldn’t come at a better time.

Oh, did we mention that the cops were contacted by a driver who claimed she was side-swiped and almost run off the road by the alleged offending driver, George L. Beal, an apparent serial OUI offender?

The Patriot Ledger reported:

Police said they got a 911 call around 12:40 a.m. Sunday from a woman who said she was on Route 3A in Hingham following a 2008 Infiniti G7 that had struck the side of her car and kept driving without stopping. An officer parked at the Summer Street rotary spotted the Infiniti and pulled it over near Hingham District Court on George Washington Boulevard, police said.

According to that same article, Beal was obviously intoxicated.

The officer reported that Beal was unsteady on his feet while performing a field sobriety test and appeared confused when asked about the crash with the other car. Beal told the officer he had "a couple of beers and a captain and Coke" but didn't think he was drunk, police said.

MyFoxBoston.com reported that Beal, who failed a sobriety test, had a blood alcohol level of .15, nearly twice the legal limit.

The Boston Globe reported that Beal, of Hull, was previously cited for operating under the influence in 2005.