This courtroom sketch depicts Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev during arraignment in federal court Wednesday, July 10, 2013 in Boston. The 19-year-old has been charged with using a weapon of mass destruction, and could face the death penalty. (AP Photo/Margaret Small)
This courtroom sketch depicts Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev during arraignment in federal court Wednesday, July 10, 2013 in Boston.
Margaret Small/AP photo

In court filings, the lawyers for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev said the Boston Marathon bombing suspect repeatedly requested a lawyer and complained about his deteriorating medical condition, yet was continuously interrogated by the FBI, The Boston Globe reported.

The FBI agents told him his brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who had been killed earlier, was still alive, and they turned away defense lawyers who arrived at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center on his behalf, according to the court documents, with one agent saying Tsarnaev was not even in custody.

In filings made on Wednesday, the lawyers said Tsarnaev, who had multiple gunshot wounds to his head and couldn’t speak, was questioned by a “high value interrogation group” and was prescribed powerful medications.

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The lawyers are seeking to have US District Court Judge George A. O’Toole Jr. strike any statements Tsarnaev made before he had an attorney, saying his constitutional rights were violated. The lawyers also said the FBI did not record the interrogations and Tsarnaev’s notes, in which he wrote lawyer 10 times, give a better picture of the circumstances of the interrogation.

Tsarnaev faces the possibility of the death penalty in the April 15, 2013 bombings that killed three people and injured more than 260. Defense attorneys also put in a request to strike down the death penalty, saying the federal government should not push a punishment that has been abolished in Massachusetts.