Branden Mattier, center stands in a Boston courtroom, beside his attorney Claudia Perez Tomao, during his arraignment where he was charged with trying to defraud One Fund Boston by claiming his aunt had been injured in the bombing, though she has been dead for a decade. Josh Reynolds for The Boston Globe (Metro, Schworm)
Branden Mattier, center stands in a Boston courtroom, beside his attorney Claudia Perez Tomao, during his arraignment where he was charged with trying to defraud One Fund Boston by claiming his aunt had been injured in the bombing, though she has been dead for a decade.
Josh Reynolds/Globe

Two Boston brothers accused of attempting to defraud a Boston Marathon victims’ charity out of over $2 million were found guilty in a Suffolk Superior Court Friday afternoon.

Branden Mattier, 23, and Domunique Grice, 28, both of the South End, filed a false claim with One Fund Boston on behalf of their aunt Onevia Bradley, according to Attorney General Martha Coakley’s office.

Small problem: Bradley never received any treatment for injuries sustained at the Boston Marathon bombing. In fact, she had been dead for more than ten years.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

That didn’t stop both men from attending an information session for the Fund, chowing down complimentary dinners intended only for victims and their loved ones, and even brazenly granting media interviews in which they discussed the importance of compensating affected families.

The conspiracy was discovered after Mattier submitted a falsified letter, purportedly from the Boston Medical Center, that contradicted an earlier account of Bradley’s injuries—specifically, claiming she had lost two legs, rather than the one they had initially reported. Whoops.

The pair had a reservation to test-drive a Mercedes-Benz E350 the day they accepted a fake check for $2.195 million, but were instead promptly arrested by authorities.

Mattier and Grice were found guilty of conspiracy to commit larceny over $250 and attempted larceny over $250 following a four-day trial.

Mattier was also found guilty of an additional charge of identity fraud.