Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy announces steps under the Clean Air Act to cut carbon pollution from existing power plants during a news conference in Washington June 2, 2014.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy announces steps under the Clean Air Act to cut carbon pollution from existing power plants during a news conference in Washington June 2, 2014.
Joshua Roberts/REUTERS

John Kerry may be the highest-placed Bostonian in the federal government, but if you’re looking for the federal official who’s the most “Boston,” look no further than Environmental Protection Agency chief Gina McCarthy. The Dorchester native and Tufts alum has an accent that rivals Mayor Marty Walsh’s for its breadth and timbre.

You can hear it here:

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

So it’s hardly a surprise that she decided to pen a memo this week attacking The New York Times when the paper wrote what she thought was an inaccurate article about the EPA and its role in writing new, tough pollution regulations.

The Hill reports:

In the memo, McCarthy praised EPA staff for securing a “dozen major victories in the Supreme Court” while crafting the “historic” carbon pollution limits for existing power plants.

“Unless you ask the New York Times,” McCarthy quipped.

“According to an article from Monday, you just cut and pasted a particular [non-governmental organization’s] proposal and called it a day. If you’re laughing right now, it’s because you know just how preposterous that is.”

If you read it out loud in your best Dorchester accent, you can really pick up the music in that quote. The only off note is the word “preposterous,” which perhaps was a softer choice for use in a federal memo.

The Times story credited the National Resources Defense Council with shaping most of the regulation used by the EPA in the new regulations, a charge echoed by the coal industry in the same article. After lashing out at the Times, McCarthy continued the memo by thanking EPA staff for all their work in crafting the regulations.