Cleanup and repairs were in high gear in the areas of Revere damaged by Monday's tornado. A worker stands atop a truck as he surveys the boarded-up windows of damaged homes on Taft Street.
Cleanup and repairs were in high gear in the areas of Revere damaged by Monday's tornado. A worker stands atop a truck as he surveys the boarded-up windows of damaged homes on Taft Street.
John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe

Revere residents at a post-tornado community meeting Wednesday were in no mood to hear excuses from insurers, the state and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. As residents struggled to clean up after a tornado tore through the city on Monday, many vented their anger at what many perceived as lackluster support from the state.

The Boston Globe reports:

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“The city of Revere did a phenomenal job cleaning up, but where’s the state?” said 37-year-old homeowner Niko Kostopoulos, whose property suffered extensive damage from wind and fallen tree limbs. “If the city has to pay the bill, it’s going to fall back on the taxpayers. ... We fought hard for the casino, and now we’re going to have to fight just as hard to get some aid.”

Residents also audibly groaned when Revere Mayor Dan Rizzo said insurance companies would be on their best behavior since the disaster was top news across the state, according to the Globe.

The perceived lack of state support isn’t the only thing bothering victims in Revere. Earlier today, it became clear that the disaster in the city likely does not meet the minimum threshold set by FEMA for federal aid. The agency requires major damage to at least 100 homes and at least $9.1 million in total damage before it chips in a penny of federal aid. Revere had 65 homes severely damaged.