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How Boston's bike-sharing program might work

“Bike share will transform Boston into a world-class biking city,’’ said Nicole Freedman, the city’s “bike czar.’’ “Bike share will transform Boston into a world-class biking city,’’ said Nicole Freedman, the city’s “bike czar.’’ (Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff)
July 29, 2009

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▸ The city envisions making available between 1,000 and 3,000 bikes at stations 300 or 400 yards apart, located at subway and bus stops, main squares, tourist sites, and areas across city neighborhoods.

▸ One proposal would offer daily passes costing $2.50 or annual memberships for $40 that would allow for discounts. After the cyclist pays for a pass or membership, the first 30 minutes of any ride would be free, but longer rides would be charged at an hourly rate.

▸ The average bike-share trip is less than 2 miles and 30 minutes long.

▸ Less than 1 percent of Bostonians commute by bike, according to the US Census.

▸ In Lyon, France, which has a bike-sharing program and is similar in size to Boston, 13 percent commute by bike.

▸ According to the International Bicycle Fund, cyclists who begin commuting on average lose 13 pounds in the first year.