THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Ink spill on I-95 ramp forces rerouting, repaving

Workers prepared to right the tractor-trailer that overturned on the ramp to Interstate 95 North in Peabody yesterday. Workers prepared to right the tractor-trailer that overturned on the ramp to Interstate 95 North in Peabody yesterday. (Winslow Townson for The Boston Globe)
By Katherine Landergan and Jenna Duncan
Globe Correspondents / March 10, 2011

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

A tractor-trailer hauling industrial printer cartridges rolled over yesterday morning on the ramp from Route 128 North to Interstate 95 North in Peabody, spewing ink across the roadway, State Police said.

The ramp was shut down for the rest of day as crews cleaned up the mess, then replaced a section of roadway, officials said.

No other vehicles were involved and the truck’s driver was not injured in the accident, which occurred about 6:10 a.m., authorities said.

State Police Sergeant Michael Popovics said the ramp is expected to reopen before this morning’s commute.

The cause of the accident is under investigation and it is not known if any citations will be issued, he said.

About 500 feet of the roadway had to be ground down and repaved last night, said Adam Hurtubise, spokesman for the state Department of Transportation.

Workers from TMC Services Inc., an environmental cleanup company in Bellingham, had tried to remove the ink by laying sand to soak it, then sweeping the sand away.

Officials decided to replace the affected section of road because removing the ink proved difficult, and they were concerned that today’s rain would push the ink into storm drains and larger water bodies and wetlands, said Joe Ferson, a spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection.

The truck was delivering about 16,000 pounds of red, yellow, and blue ink cartridges to a newspaper company in Portland, Maine, according to Ferson.

Several hundred gallons of ink splattered onto the road, he said.

The ink was nonflammable, but workers donned protective gear to avoid skin contact, Ferson said.

Martin Finucane contributed to this story.