Lisa and Oliver Bain enjoy some raisins in this family photo.
Lisa and Oliver Bain enjoy some raisins in this family photo.
COURTESY

Kids have no shortage of nightmare scenarios to unleash upon the adults of the world, and sticking foreign objects up their nose seems to be a favorite among the toddler crowd.

The Bain family of Palo Alto, California, stumbled onto such a situation last week, when their 3-year-old son Oliver matter-of-factly announced from his car seat that the “raisin in [his] nose was uncomfortable.”

Yeesh. The youngster had never put anything in his nose before, but his mother Lisa—a pediatrician who spent her residency at Mass General—knew exactly what to do.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

Oliver’s Dad Alex, doing what Dads do best, videotaped the entire incident for posterity:

Lisa used a quick solution she’s taught many parents in the emergency room: close your child’s unobstructed nostril with your hand and blow air into their mouth.

After one or two solid puffs, Lisa said the obstruction almost always falls out.

“I learned it during my residency…[but] it’s never come in handy for my own kids,” Bain said. “It’s a technique any parent can use to save themselves a trip to the ER...it’s never failed [for me].”

While having objects stuck in a child’s nose isn’t a serious emergency, it can be extremely uncomfortable and dangerous for younger babies who breathe solely through their nose, Lisa said. Left unattended, lodged objects could also cause an infection.

Oliver, however, is doing well, and will hopefully avoid any nasal excavations in the future.

“His Dad said [the video] is something we’ll be able to pull out on prom night,” Lisa laughed.