We’ve all heard of Stonehedge, but it’s not the only man-made structure that has the pleasure of occasionally aligning with the sun’s cosmic positions.

Thanks to its grid system and largely unhampered view of the horizon, New Yorkers are treated to a semi-annual display of the sun rising and setting directly down the middle of its city blocks, in a phenomenon known as “Manhattanhenge.”

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The term was coined by astrophysicist and long-time New Yorker Neil deGrasse Tyson.

“For best effect, position yourself as far east in Manhattan as possible,” he writes. “But ensure that when you look west across the avenues you can still see New Jersey.”

Tyson notes 34th and 42nd streets are “especially striking vistas.”

Manhattanites took to Instagram to capture the display, which was in full-force Friday evening:


Despite its notoriously windy and bewildering street layout, parts of Boston also have their own “-henges,” including Commhenge, Back Bayhenge, MIThenge, Southiehenge and more.

This map lays out the best locations for viewings in our fair city, but note the dates—referring to 2013—may shift slightly from year-to-year.