Alissa Chavez, the inventor of The Hot Seat.
Alissa Chavez, the inventor of The Hot Seat.
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An Albuquerque, New Mexico teen has invented a device she says could deter the rising number of infant hot car deaths in the US. Now a senior in high school, Alissa Chavez came up with the carseat pad she calls “The Hot Seat” for her eighth grade science project, reports NBC.

Chavez’s proposal includes a seat pad which works with a keychain, a car alarm, and the user’s smartphone to warn parents and passersby if a child has been left in a vehicle with rising temperatures. “It’s loud enough to grab people’s attention around the vehicle, as well as remind the parent on their key fob or their cell phone,” Chavez told NBC.

She reportedly has a patent for the device and is currently raising funds to create an official prototype in an effort to get the invention on store shelves. The city of Albuquerque honored her earlier this month for her dedication to potentially saving lives.

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“Alissa’s work is remarkable and inspirational,” Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry told local news station KOB4. “Her heartfelt invention is the exact mentality we’re trying to encourage and foster in our city; identifying a need and filling it with an entrepreneurial solution.”

According to nationwide data from KidsAndCars.org, at least 18 children have died in hot cars so far this year, and at least 44 children died of heat stroke in cars last year.

Chavez told NBC she has also been inventing other products since she was 11, but is waiting to pursue plans on those projects until The Hot Seat is available to the public.