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Romney's record

On several issues, Mitt Romney is putting the best spin on his accomplishments as Massachusetts governor.

Healthcare

What Romney says on campaign trail: "So we talked to the insurance companies and we said, 'How do we get the premiums down?' They said, 'You know, you put so many mandates and restrictions and regulations on us, if you removed some of those, we could get the premiums lower, so they'd be more affordable.' And we did. We went from a $350 monthly premium for an individual seeking coverage down to $175."

The record: The premiums cited are for the lowest-cost plans for 37-year-olds. The drop in prices mostly came from a combination of political pressure on insurance companies, restrictions on access to specific healthcare providers, and the consolidation of the small-group and individual markets.

Immigration

What new radio ad says: "As governor, Mitt Romney didn't wait on Washington. He acted to make our immigration laws work. Mitt Romney is the exceptional governor who took a stand so State Police could enforce federal immigration laws."

The record: Romney announced in June 2006 that he was seeking an agreement with federal authorities to allow State Police to arrest illegal immigrants. He signed the pact in December, during his last weeks as governor. But before the troopers had completed their training, Deval Patrick rescinded the agreement in January just after becoming governor. He replaced it with a plan to identify illegal immigrants in the prison population and deport them once they serve their sentences.

Spending

What Romney has said: He closed a $3 billion budget deficit by cutting government waste instead of raising taxes.

The record: The $3 billion deficit, projected by his administration and legislators when Romney took office in January 2003, never rose that high. Romney and the Legislature slashed $1.6 billion from the 2004 budget, but also generated $500 million by raising fees and by closing corporate tax loopholes -- actions some business leaders viewed as tax increases.

LISA WANGSNESS AND ALICE DEMBNER

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