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Giuliani set to unveil tax policy

Wants to eliminate marriage penalty and the death tax

Rudy Giuliani turned down a lunch yesterday offered by Amy Pierson (left), assistant manager of Ross' Restaurant in Bettendorf, Iowa, as he sat with manager Melissa Freidhof-Rogers. Rudy Giuliani turned down a lunch yesterday offered by Amy Pierson (left), assistant manager of Ross' Restaurant in Bettendorf, Iowa, as he sat with manager Melissa Freidhof-Rogers. (larry fisher/quad city times via ASSOCIATED PRESS)

MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Presidential hopeful Rudy Giuliani plans today to unveil his proposed tax policy, which would permanently kill the so-called marriage penalty and death tax.

In a speech prepared for this morning, Giuliani will tell voters he is the best option to help them have more control over their money. As part of his standard stump speech, the former New York mayor reminds voters he cut taxes 23 times.

"Today, every single one of the Democratic presidential candidates is promising a massive tax hike on the American people," Giuliani will say in the remarks. "The most important thing to understand about this issue that the Democrats just don't understand: your money, your choice."

The cornerstone of Giuliani's campaign has been tax cuts, greater freedoms over spending, and less government. He plans to tell voters they face $3 trillion in tax increases over the next decade unless tax cuts are made permanent -- something most Democrats have opposed. He also plans to advocate for a permanent child tax credit and lower marginal tax rates.

Giuliani wants to tie marginal tax rates to the current levels, set there temporarily, and perhaps cut the rates further. He also plans to tie the alternative minimum tax to the rate of inflation, which Giuliani said would stop tax increases on 30 million Americans by 2010.

Giuliani, who leads the Republican field in most national polls but trails former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney in recent New Hampshire polls, said he will "give the death tax the death penalty." The death tax taxes wealth passed on through inheritance. The current rate is set at 45 percent through 2009, but it drops to zero in 2010, and jumps to 55 percent in 2011. Giuliani proposes to keep that rate at zero.

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