THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Presidential dynasties can add layer of secrecy

Executive privilege allows for keeping documents sealed

Bill Clinton campaigned for his wife yesterday at a college in North Charleston, S.C. If elected president, Hillary Clinton could block the release of his White House papers, and her power would become especially important if she were reelected in 2012. Bill Clinton campaigned for his wife yesterday at a college in North Charleston, S.C. If elected president, Hillary Clinton could block the release of his White House papers, and her power would become especially important if she were reelected in 2012. (Tyrone Walker/The Post and Courier)
By Charlie Savage
Globe Staff / November 13, 2007

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

WASHINGTON - A dispute over limits that Bill and Hillary Clinton have placed on the National Archives' ability to release their White House records is highlighting a consequence of family dynasties in contemporary American politics: A president has sweeping power to keep potentially embarrassing documents from past administrations a secret. (Full article: 861 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass

Boston.com top stories on Twitter

    waiting for twitterWaiting for Twitter to feed in the latest...