THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Coal's ascent is igniting a debate

W. Virginians split over costs, benefits

Maria Gunnoe, 39, seen on her property in Bob White, W.Va., in April 2006, has been fighting to stop mountaintop-removal coal mining since her farm was flooded in June 2003. 'Clean coal is a complete and total lie,' said Gunnoe, who has reportedly received death threats. Maria Gunnoe, 39, seen on her property in Bob White, W.Va., in April 2006, has been fighting to stop mountaintop-removal coal mining since her farm was flooded in June 2003. "Clean coal is a complete and total lie," said Gunnoe, who has reportedly received death threats. (Antrim Caskey for the boston globe)
By John Donnelly
Globe Staff / December 26, 2007

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TWILIGHT, W.Va. - Even the name of this place speaks of an end ahead. Surrounded by the rubble of mountaintops obliterated to mine coal, several of tiny Twilight's homes have been demolished. King Coal bought and removed them. Now, the town is on the same path as scores of other West Virginia communities that gradually lost their residents and died ... (Full article: 1375 words)

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