THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Campaign Notebook

Romney's no longer running, but wins conservatives' straw vote

Email|Print| Text size +
February 10, 2008

Mitt Romney suspended his presidential bid at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, D.C., but he won the straw vote among activists there anyway.

In results posted yesterday on the conference website, Romney won 35 percent to John McCain's 34 percent. Mike Huckabee and Ron Paul each won 12 percent.

It appears that if he hadn't withdrawn on Thursday, the former Massachusetts governor would have won by an even bigger margin. Three-fourths of the 1,558 ballots were turned in after his speech - and his support dropped from 44 percent in pre-speech ballots to 32 percent afterward.

Ironically, however, that conservative support didn't translate strongly enough in primaries and caucuses to keep Romney in the race. He dropped out after Super Tuesday's results left him about 400 delegates behind McCain.

FOON RHEE

Ohio officials clash over paper ballots
CINCINNATI - Ohio's effort to clean up its voting system before its key presidential primary on March 4 has pitted state election leaders against local officials over an order to provide a paper ballot to any voter who requests one.

Secretary of State Jennifer L. Brunner, a Democrat, wants to eliminate touch-screen machines for the November election from the 53 counties that still use them and install optical scan machines to provide a paper trail.

Because the conversion cannot be completed in time for the primary in most counties, Brunner ordered the printing of paper ballots as an interim step.

"The paper ballots are not only going to provide a voter alternative for those who prefer not to use touch-screen machines, but they may also alleviate long lines," Brunner said. "We expect a much higher than normal turnout in the primary."

But some local officials contend the paper ballots are unnecessary and have gone to court to fight the requirement.

"We felt it was a waste of taxpayer money because we have confidence in our system," said David Phillips, the county prosecutor in Union County, who estimated the paper ballot initiative would cost his county $68,000. He argued that state law put the choice of voting systems in the hands of county officials.

Ohio is scrambling to correct serious flaws in its voting systems that were uncovered in a study released in December. Touch-screen machines were found to be vulnerable to hackers using devices as rudimentary as magnets and personal digital assistants, and security measures were found to be inadequate to prevent fraud.

NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE

Ice-cream maker endorses Barack
John Edwards hasn't endorsed anyone yet in the tight Democratic race. But one of his best-known supporters - Ben Cohen of Ben & Jerry's fame - has opted for Barack Obama, the Illinois senator's campaign announced yesterday.

"I support Barack Obama because he is the kind of leader America needs right now. By taking on special interests and uniting our country around a common purpose, he will change politics in Washington," Cohen said in a statement issued by the Obama camp. "When Barack Obama is president, we will finally have a government that works for all Americans."

Edwards, the Democratic vice presidential nominee in 2004, ended his second bid for president on Jan. 30. Despite entreaties from both Obama and Hillary Clinton, however, he has not thrown his support to either.

FOON RHEE

more stories like this

  • Email
  • Email
  • Print
  • Print
  • Single page
  • Single page
  • Reprints
  • Reprints
  • Share
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Comment
 
  • Share on DiggShare on Digg
  • Tag with Del.icio.us Save this article
  • powered by Del.icio.us
Your Name Your e-mail address (for return address purposes) E-mail address of recipients (separate multiple addresses with commas) Name and both e-mail fields are required.
Message (optional)
Disclaimer: Boston.com does not share this information or keep it permanently, as it is for the sole purpose of sending this one time e-mail.