THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Chapter 7: The Patriarch

Their sorrows, his cause

It is one thing about Ted Kennedy no one doubts: His gift for consolation, for somehow always being there

By Don Aucoin
Globe Staff / February 22, 2009

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

Even though he had just lost a key vote in the Senate on a cherished piece of legislation — the patients' bill of rights — there was a lightness to Senator Edward M. Kennedy's step as he strode out of the Capitol on a Thursday night in mid-July of 1999. (Full article: 4700 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass
  • E-mail
  • E-mail
  • Print
  • Print
  • Single page
  • Single page
  • Reprints
  • Reprints
  • Share
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Comment
 
  • Share on DiggShare on Digg
  • Tag with Del.icio.us Save this article
  • powered by Del.icio.us
Your Name Your E-mail address (for return address purposes) E-mail address of recipients (separate multiple addresses with commas) Name and both E-mail fields are required.
Message (optional)
Disclaimer: Boston.com does not share this information or keep it permanently, as it is for the sole purpose of sending this one time E-mail.
Special Features
Throughout the story, look here for photos, videos, notes, and more related to the passage you’re reading.
Video

When they needed him most

They know about the scandals and the singular achievements, but for many people what most endures about Ted Kennedy is his gift, especially in times of sorrow, for compassionate connection. He sought them out; he helped.
Slideshow

Uncle Teddy and the Kennedy kids

Get Adobe Flash player

Kennedy there for his family, young and old

Three-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr. salutes his father's casket in Washington on Nov. 25, 1963, three days after the president was assassinated in Dallas. Jacqueline Kennedy and daughter Caroline Kennedy are accompanied by Edward Kennedy (left) and Robert Kennedy. (AP) Three-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr. salutes his father's casket in Washington on Nov. 25, 1963, three days after the president was assassinated in Dallas. Jacqueline Kennedy and daughter Caroline Kennedy are accompanied by Edward Kennedy (left) and Robert Kennedy.
Slideshow

JFK Jr. grows up, dies in crash

Get Adobe Flash player
Video

Senator Kennedy remembers Bobby

Admiring another Ted

Ted Williams, one of Kennedy's boyhood heroes, symbolized the kind of heroism Kennedy knew he had to reach for: an indefatigable day-to-day reliability. (AP) Ted Williams, one of Kennedy's boyhood heroes, symbolized the kind of heroism Kennedy knew he had to reach for: an indefatigable day-to-day reliability.
Slideshow

Kennedy there for other families

Get Adobe Flash player

The aftermath of 9/11

Kennedy remained a lifeline for families affected by the 9/11 attacks and he urged then-Senate majority leader Tom Daschle (right) to support the appointment of a former Kennedy chief of staff as the special master of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund. Kennedy remained a lifeline for families affected by the 9/11 attacks and he urged then-Senate majority leader Tom Daschle (right) to support the appointment of a former Kennedy chief of staff as the special master of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund.

A personal interest in the troops

A portrait of Private First Class John D. Hart, who was killed by a roadside bomb in Iraq in 2003. After his death, John's parents, Brian and Alma Hart, worked with Senator Kennedy to get better armor for US soldiers. The Harts told Kennedy that their son had been ambushed while riding in a canvas-topped Humvee that had no armor, no bulletproof shields, not even a metal door. A portrait of Private First Class John D. Hart, who was killed by a roadside bomb in Iraq in 2003. After his death, John's parents, Brian and Alma Hart, worked with Senator Kennedy to get better armor for US soldiers. The Harts told Kennedy that their son had been ambushed while riding in a canvas-topped Humvee that had no armor, no bulletproof shields, not even a metal door.
Video

Kennedy leaving the hospital

Video

Kennedy speaks before the DNC

Kennedy at the DNC

Kennedy acknowledges the crowd at the end of his speech at the Democratic National Convention in Denver in August 2008. Kennedy acknowledges the crowd at the end of his speech at the Democratic National Convention in Denver in August 2008.