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The Gulf of Mexico oil spill

The explosion of BP's Deepwater Horizon rig on April 20, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico triggered the largest oil spill in US history. Millions of gallons of oil continued to leak until July 15. This page contains stories about the results of the spill.
A helicopter flew over surface oil in the Gulf of Mexico on May 18, 2010. (Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace/Reuters) A helicopter flew over surface oil in the Gulf of Mexico on May 18, 2010.

BP to pay billions over massive 2010 Gulf oil spill

A person familiar with the deal also said two BP employees face manslaughter charges over those killed in the oil rig explosion that led to the spill. (AP, 9:30 a.m.)

Feds make 1st arrest in BP oil spill case

The Justice Department said on Tuesday it filed the first criminal charges in the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, accusing a former BP engineer of destroying evidence. (AP, 4/24/2012)

Scientists: Gulf health nearly at pre-spill level

Scientists judge the overall health of the Gulf of Mexico as nearly back to normal one year after the BP oil spill, but with glaring blemishes that restrain their optimism about nature's resiliency, an Associated Press survey of researchers shows. (AP, 4/18/11)

BP halts flow of oil; anxious wait begins

BP announced that it had capped its hemorrhaging well, at least temporarily, marking the first time in nearly three months that oil was not gushing into the Gulf of Mexico. (Boston Globe, 7/16/10)

Migration to gulf a new threat to endangered plovers

The piping plover had all but disappeared by the 1980s along the East Coast, as beaches were developed and visited more often. Now, the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico appears to be the tiny white bird’s latest nemesis. (Globe Staff, 7/2/10)

Oil leak reaching crisis proportions

The massive oil well leak in the Gulf of Mexico abruptly turned into a national crisis, when scientists realized oil is probably gushing from the seafloor at five times the rate they first thought. (By Beth Daley, Boston Globe, 4/30/10)