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COMMENTARY
A right-wing conspiracy? You be the judge

Globe Clinton shifts focus to Kosovo and Mexico

NEWS ANALYSIS
An altered political landscape

Unexpected winners likely to be women

IN MEXICO
Clinton's trip: more image than diplomacy

GOP gathering: Forget Clinton, focus on 2000

Clinton's trial:
A special report

YEAR THAT WAS
Tracking the effects of Clinton's infidelity

VICE PRESIDENT
Impeachment acquittal breaks both ways for Gore prospects

THE GOP
For Republicans, time to listen to America's voices

VICTIMS COUNT
The uncelebrated played bit parts, paid big prices

THE MEDIA
Questions still shadow scandal's impact

THE CONGRESS
Senate may emerge more unified than ever

THE PRECEDENTS
With presidential impeachments, little set in stone

FROM CHAPEL HILL
Come the year 2130, historians will be puzzled

FROM OXFORD
Impeachment: It's a medieval relic better left unused

IN FOCUS
Clinton's split- screen moments

ROBERT A. JORDAN
Starr and Tripp now deserve a grilling on their activities

Prior coverage

CLINTON ACQUITTED
2 charges fail; vote seen as House rebuff

THE SENATE
With verdict finally tallied, a quiet relief fills chamber

PUBLIC REACTION
To the very end, a case of national indifference

CONTINUING PROBE
White House still worried by Starr

TRIPP/JONES
Tripp's remarks revised

THE VOTING
Moderates cross aisle in New England GOP

POLL FAVORITE
Mrs. Clinton may consider Senate race in N.Y.

THE WHITE HOUSE
Sober Clinton asks for reconciliation in Rose Garden talk

IN CITY: RELIEF, INDIGNATION
In city, relief and some indignation

GLOBE EDITORIAL
Bruised by impeachment

DEC.19, 1998
Clinton is impeached


BACKGROUND -CHRONOLOGY
-WHAT IT MEANS
-THE ARTICLES
-TERMS GLOSSARY

Full text
-STARR'S PREPARED TEXT -STARR REPORT
-REBUTTAL
-REBUTTAL #2
-CLINTON TESTIMONY
-CLINTON'S 81 ANSWERS
-LEWINSKY TESTIMONY
-TRIPP TAPES

Video
BROADCAST.COM
-CLINTON'S GRAND JURY TESTIMONY

NECNEWS.COM
-STARR'S JUDICIARY COMMITTEE TESTIMONY
-COMMITTEE IMPEACHMENT DEBATE

Side-by-side
Comparing the two arguments

Clinton is impeached

Article I: Passed (228-206)
Alleges perjury before Kenneth Starr's grand jury on Aug. 17, 1998.
YEA NAY PRES. NO VOTE
GOP
223
6
0
0
DEMOCRAT
5
199
0
1
IND.
0
1
0
0
TOTALS
228
206
0
1

[ ROLL CALL ]

Article II: Failed (229-205)
Alleges perjury in sworn, written answers on Dec. 23, 1997, and during taped testimony in the Paula Jones lawsuit.
YEA NAY PRES. NO VOTE
GOP
200
28
0
0
DEMOCRAT
5
200
0
1
IND.
0
1
0
0
TOTALS
205
229
0
1

[ ROLL CALL ]

Article III: Passed (221-212)
Alleges Clinton obstructed justice. Article lists seven alleged acts.
YEA NAY PRES. NO VOTE
GOP
216
12
0
0
DEMOCRAT
5
199
0
2
IND.
0
1
0
0
TOTALS
221
212
0
2

[ ROLL CALL ]

Article IV: Failed (285-148)
Alleges that Clinton engaged in conduct that resulted in misuse or abuse of power.
YEA NAY PRES. NO VOTE
GOP
147
81
0
0
DEMOCRAT
1
203
0
2
IND.
0
1
0
0
TOTALS
148
285
0
2

[ ROLL CALL ]

- - Complete list of articles - -

House approves 2 of 4 charges, paving the way for Senate trial

By Bob Hohler, Globe Staff, 12/20/98

ASHINGTON - The US House of Representatives impeached President Clinton yesterday on charges of obstructing justice and lying to a federal grand jury about his sexual affair with a former White House intern, forever tarnishing his legacy and forcing the Senate to decide his fate.

Rocked by partisan tumult and the startling resignation of Speaker-designate Robert L. Livingston, the Republican-controlled House approved the two charges almost entirely on party lines, impeaching a president for the first time in 130 years and only the second time in history.

Two other charges - abuse of power and lying under oath in a civil deposition - were rejected after a turbulent debate marked by soaring rhetoric, raw anger, and conflicting visions of the consequences of recommending the 42d president's removal from office.

In the somber aftermath, Representative Henry J. Hyde, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, carried two leather-bound articles of impeachment through the grand, chandeliered halls of Congress to the Senate, where the next chapter of Clinton's crisis will unfold.

The Senate, barring a negotiated resolution, will put Clinton on trial when the 106th Congress convenes in early January. If 67 senators vote to convict him on either charge, he would be automatically removed from office, the first president ever to endure such disgrace.

''We have fulfilled our duty to our magnificent Constitution,'' said Livingston, who earlier had shocked the House by announcing he will abandon his pending speakership - and resign from the House entirely later next year - amid controversy over his recently disclosed adultery.

''We are not ruled by kings or emperors,'' Livingston said, ''and there is no divine right of presidents.''

Clinton, portraying his impeachment as the product of ''poisonous venom and excessive partisanship,'' vowed afterward to serve out his term despite a fresh flurry of calls for his resignation. He made the pledge on the White House lawn, surrounded by House Democrats who had tried to spare him the shame of impeachment.

''We have just witnessed a partisan vote that was a disgrace to our country and our Constitution,'' said the House Democratic leader, Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri.

On a gray, wintry day in Washington, as US forces continued a massive airstrike against Iraq, the first impeachment count passed the House at 1:25 p.m. six days before Christmas.

The charge alleges that Clinton repeatedly and ''willfully provided perjurious, false and misleading testimony'' to a federal grand jury investigating his illicit affair with the former intern, Monica S. Lewinsky.

''Article I is approved,'' announced Representative Ray LaHood, an Illinois Republican who presided over the turbulent, two-day debate.

Five members of each party broke ranks as the House approved the charge, 228-206. The only New England representatives who voted for the perjury count were Charles F. Bass and John E. Sununu of New Hampshire and Nancy L. Johnson of Connecticut, all Republicans.

At 1:59, the obstruction of justice charge passed by a narrower margin, 221-212, as the five dissenting Democrats made the difference by joining 216 GOP lawmakers in supporting the count. Twelve Republicans opposed the charge, including Johnson.

That left Bass and Sununu as the only New Englanders supporting the obstruction charge, which lists seven allegations that Clinton engaged in an elaborate attempt to conceal his affair with Lewinsky in the face of a sexual harassment suit that was filed against him by Paula Corbin Jones and settled last month for $850,000.

Each charge states: ''William Jefferson Clinton has undermined the integrity of his office, has brought disrepute on the presidency, has betrayed his trust as president, and has acted in a manner subversive of the rule of law and justice, to the manifest injury of the people of the United States.''

The Senate majority leader, Trent Lott of Mississippi, said he has begun the process of organizing a trial and senators were ''prepared to fulfill their constitutional obligations'' in the impeachment case.

''The decision by the House of Representatives concerning the conduct of the president sets in motion a solemn process in the Senate of the United States,'' Lott said.

Senators in both parties issued statements declaring their sadness about the impeachment and their intention to judge Clinton fairly. Others expressed outrage. ''The House action is an insult to the country and the Constitution,'' said Senator Edward M. Kennedy. ''The impeachment resolution is irreparably poisoned by the vindictive partisanship of the House Republican extremists.''

His fellow Massachusetts Democrat, Senator John F. Kerry, was no less harsh. Blasting the GOP refusal to allow a censure vote, he said, ''That is disgraceful, and the Republicans will pay a high price for their fear of the democratic process.''

Kerry added: ''We desperately need to move away from this modern-day Salem witch hunt.''

Representative Tom Allen, a Maine Democrat who voted against two articles and expressed opposition to all of them, did not vote on the obstruction and abuse of power counts because he rushed home for his daughter's wedding.

He left a House divided. ''My God, what kind of country are we becoming?'' Representative Martin T. Meehan, a Lowell Democrat, said on the House floor. ''What kind of institution are we becoming?''

The House rejected the charge that Clinton lied under oath in the civil deposition, 229-205, as 29 Republicans broke ranks, including Christopher Shays of Connecticut, the only GOP member from New England to vote against all four counts. Bass, Sununu, and Johnson supported the charge.

The final count, alleging abuse of power, was handily rejected, 285-148, with Sununu the only New Englander to support it.

The vote, at 2:13 p.m., ended Clinton's impeachment House odyssey, which deeply divided the institution and indirectly toppled two speakers, Newt Gingrich and his would-be successor.

In a stunning development, Livingston was midway through a speech calling on Clinton to resign when several Democrats began chanting, ''You resign.'' Livingston, as it happened, was about to do just that.

''I must set the example that I hope President Clinton will follow,'' he said.

In an unprecedented scene, the House was occupied for the next several hours with debating Clinton's impeachment and with a mad scramble among GOP leaders for the suddenly vacant speakership.

Amid the chaos, Hyde sought to stay the course toward completing the House case against Clinton.

''Equal justice under the law, that's what we're fighting for,'' Hyde said in appealing for impeachment. ''When the chief law enforcement officer trivializes, ignores, shreds, and minimizes the sanctity of the oath, then justice is wounded, and you're wounded, and your children are wounded.''

Democrats denounced what they described as a partisan vendetta against Clinton orchestrated by a small group of conservative leaders. They set the tone for debate immediately after they uttered the last words of the pledge of allegiance, ''liberty and justice for all.''

''All! All! All!'' they chanted to protest what they called the unfairness of the case.

At times, the rhetoric turned hostile. ''This place is full of hate. I know a bunch of bullies when I see them. The bullies get theirs, and you're going to get yours,'' Representative Jose E. Serrano, a New York Democrat, shouted at Republicans. ''The people are going to rise up from California to New York.''

Seething with frustration, Democrats walked out of the chamber en masse and boycotted part of the vote on the first article after GOP leaders blocked their attempt to vote on a censure alternative.

''This impeachment has left a stain on this institution,'' said Representative William D. Delahunt, a Quincy Democrat.

Republican leaders vigorously rejected criticism that they were impeaching Clinton over circumstances stemming from a private, consensual affair. Many GOP members, like Representative J.C. Watts of Oklahoma, said the case is about defending the rule of law in the face of polls that showed broad opposition to Clinton's impeachment.

''Polls measure changing feelings, not steadfast principles,'' Watts said. ''Polls would have rejected the Ten Commandments. Polls would have embraced slavery and ridiculed women's rights.''

''Bob Livingston's resignation ... is a surrender to a developing sexual McCarthyism,'' said Representative Jerrold Nadler, a New York Democrat. ''We are losing sight of the distinction between sins, which ought to be between a person and his family and his God, and crimes, which are the concern of the state and of society as a whole.''

Nadler described Clinton as a target of the same ''McCarthyism.'

Hyde agreed in part. ''Those of us who are sinners must feel especially wretched'' about Livingston's resignation, he said.

But he drew a distinction between private sexual infidelity and dishonesty in a court proceeding, describing Clinton as ''a serial violator of the oath.''

The day's events began with a rousing speech to House Democrats by Hillary Rodham Clinton. She cited her experience as a legal aide to the Watergate committee investigating President Richard M. Nixon, and railed against the notion of impeaching a president on a narrow, party line.

''She galvanized the caucus,'' Delahunt said. ''She was very inspiring.''

Several hours later, with her husband impeached, Mrs. Clinton stood silently by his side as he lashed out at the ''obsessive animosity'' of their political foes.

This story ran on page A01 of the Boston Globe on 12/20/98.
© Copyright 1998 Globe Newspaper Company.



 


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