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The Boston Globe OnlineBoston.com
Boston Globe Online / Nation | World
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'I'm just so sad that it's happened'

By Thomas Farragher, Globe Staff, 9/13/2001

Perhaps their anger will boil soon into rage.

One day, they may examine the raw hatred at the root of Tuesday's attack. Or study its geopolitics. Or analyze the methods of its mad masterminds.

But with authorities in urgent pursuit of the killers yesterday, the victims' families focused on a smoky grave at the foot of Manhattan where their fathers and their uncles - their grandmas and their girlfriends - lay buried in awful rubble.

''I'm just so sad that it's happened to us, and to my children,'' said Sharon Cahill of Wellesley, whose husband, John, was aboard United Flight 175. ''That's really as far as it goes right now.''

Bishop Kenneth A. Angell, the Roman Catholic bishop of Vermont, sought to strike a balance between his duties as a religious leader and a grieving man whose brother and sister-in-law were killed in the assault.

''I am a Christian,'' said Angell. ''I have to forgive. So I do.''

When American and United airlines released the names yesterday of passengers on the jetliners that terrorists converted into warlike missiles, the list was a rich and sturdy roll call of New England.

Sonia Morales Puopolo, 58, a former dancer from Dover, who was headed to Los Angeles for the Latin Grammy Awards.

James Trentini, 65, of Everett, whose suitcase bulged with presents for grandchildren, and who delayed his trip so he could fulfill his jury duty on Monday.

Peter Gay, 54, of Tewksbury, a Raytheon Co. executive who played a wicked game of volleyball.

David Kovalcin, 42, of Hudson, N.H., who never forgot the larger life that awaited him outside the office.

Rahma Salie, 28, and her husband, Michael Theodoridis, 32, of Boston, who were bound for a friend's wedding.

Christoffer Carstanjen, 33, of Turners Falls, a motorcycle a ficionado, who was traveling to Los Angeles to begin a weeklong motorcycle trek along the Pacific coast.

And Peter Hanson, 32, of Groton, who - with his wife, Sue, and their 3-year-old daughter, Christine, seated next to him - called his father to say goodbye.

''Pete told his parents not to worry - that if the plane was going to crash, it would happen so fast that no one would feel any pain,'' one friend said yesterday.

This story ran on page A11 of the Boston Globe on 9/13/2001.
© Copyright 2001 Globe Newspaper Company.

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