The Making of Mitt Romney
The Boston Globe
After settling into life in St. George, Romney was told by church leaders that he was needed to help settle a Mormon community in Arizona. The Romneys crossed the Colorado River at this spot, where wagons had to be pulled up a rocky ramp known as the Backbone, on the left of this picture. 'Here you can see the river hundreds of feet below you winding its way between perpendicular banks of solid rocks without a tree to be seen and devoid of vegetation,' wrote Catharine Cottam Romney, one of the wives of Miles Park Romney.
After settling into life in St. George, Romney was told by church leaders that he was needed to help settle a Mormon community in Arizona. The Romneys crossed the Colorado River at this spot, where wagons had to be pulled up a rocky ramp known as the Backbone, on the left of this picture.

"Here you can see the river hundreds of feet below you winding its way between perpendicular banks of solid rocks without a tree to be seen and devoid of vegetation," wrote Catharine Cottam Romney, one of the wives of Miles Park Romney.
(Globe Staff Photo / Essdras M Suarez)