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Aging is older than you think

Scientists used to think that E. coli (shown above, dividing) did not age, but new research suggests they do, meaning aging has deeper evolutionary roots than once thought. Scientists used to think that E. coli (shown above, dividing) did not age, but new research suggests they do, meaning aging has deeper evolutionary roots than once thought. (Janice Haney Carr)
By Carl Zimmer
Globe Correspondent / June 2, 2008

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E. coli used to be immortal. To be precise, many scientists did not believe that this gut microbe got old. E. coli - along with other bacteria - simply grew until they were ready to divide. Where one microbe had been, there were two new ones, each ready to grow and divide again. (Full article: 958 words)

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