Summary

This proposed law would repeal an existing state law that allows a qualified organization that wants to build low- or moderate-income housing to apply for a single comprehensive permit from a city or town's zoning board of appeals, instead of having to obtain separate permits from each local agency or official having jurisdiction.

The repeal would take effect Jan. 1, but would not affect any proposed housing that had already received a comprehensive permit and a building permit.

Latest news

Voter initiatives target two taxes (Boston Globe, 10/26/10)


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Arguments

Yes - Drop comprehensive permits
for low- or moderate-income housing


(Authored by John Belskis, Coalition for the Repeal of 40B, Arlington. www.repeal40B.com)

Voting 'Yes' will ensure that quality affordable housing is built and remains for our parents, children, teachers, and public employees.

Massachusetts needs more affordable housing. A 'Yes' vote will repeal the current Chapter 40B statute, a law that promotes subsidized, high-density housing on any parcel of land without regard to local regulations, the neighborhood, or the environment. By stripping away local control, it has destroyed communities in rural, suburban, and urban neighborhoods alike, while lining the pockets of out-of-state speculators.

The current statute does not build affordable housing. Rather, it maintains a corrupt law that the Massachusetts inspector general has called a "pig fest" and "represents one of the biggest abuses in state history."

A 'Yes' vote will stop this outrageous misuse of taxpayer money and allow cities and towns to build affordable housing for those who need it most.

These arguments, from the secretary of state's election website, were written by proponents and opponents of each question and reflect their opinions.

Boston.com, The Boston Globe, and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts do not endorse these arguments, and do not certify the truth or accuracy of any statement made in these arguments.

The names of the individuals and organizations who wrote each argument, and any written comments by others about each argument, are on file in the secretary of state's office.

No - Keep comprehensive permits
for low- or moderate-income housing


(Authored by Tripp Jones, chair, Campaign to Protect the Affordable Housing Law, Boston. www.protectaffordablehousing.org

This referendum would abolish the primary tool to create affordable housing in Massachusetts without providing any alternatives.

Housing in Massachusetts is very expensive. We need to protect the Affordable Housing Law so that seniors and working families can afford to buy homes here.

The Affordable Housing Law has created 58,000 homes across the state and is responsible for approximately 80% of new affordable housing over the past decade, outside the larger cities.

Repealing this law will mean the loss of badly needed construction jobs. Thousands of homes that have already been approved for development will not be built if this law is repealed. Homes and jobs will be lost, and there will be less affordable housing for seniors and working families.

A coalition of hundreds of civic, municipal, business, environmental, and religious leaders, including the League of Women Voters and AARP, urge you to vote No.

These arguments, from the secretary of state's election website, were written by proponents and opponents of each question and reflect their opinions.

Boston.com, The Boston Globe, and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts do not endorse these arguments, and do not certify the truth or accuracy of any statement made in these arguments.

The names of the individuals and organizations who wrote each argument, and any written comments by others about each argument, are on file in the secretary of state's office.

Featured

Voter initiatives target two taxes

With jobs scarce and many families just scraping by, taxes have taken center stage this political season. In Tuesday’s election, Massachusetts voters will have two opportunities to lower them. (By Peter Schworm, 10/26/10)

Critics push for repeal of 40B

Many times over the decade-long transformation of St. Aidan’s from a closed historic church into a national paragon of mixed-income housing, the Brookline project seemed doomed to fail. (By Kathleen Burge, 10/16/10)

Officials, residents divided on vote to repeal 40B affordable housing law vote

State Representative William G. Greene Jr. supports the state ballot question to repeal Chapter 40B, saying it is high time Massachusetts scrapped its four-decade-old affordable housing law. (By John Laidler, 10/6/10)

Affordable-housing law called a big boon

The state’s contentious affordable-housing law, up for repeal by voters in the Nov. 2 state election, has generated more than $9.25 billion in construction and related spending over the past 10 years, according to a study scheduled to be released today by the University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute. (By Jenifer B. McKim, 9/14/10)

Mixed success in reaching Chapter 40B goal helps fuel debate over repeal

Mike Rosenberg, chairman of the Bedford Board of Selectmen, exults in his town’s success in adding apartments and condominiums that the average teacher or police officer can afford. (By Scott Van Voorhis, 6/12/10)

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