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Lawmakers and lobbyists are part of the constant stream of foot traffic at the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.
Lawmakers and lobbyists are part of the constant stream of foot traffic at the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Globe Staff Photo / Dina Rudick)
Senator Charles Grassley (left) of Iowa wanted $50 million for a simulated rain forest inserted into the energy bill. It was rejected, but later appeared in an omnibus spending bill.
Senator Charles Grassley (left) of Iowa wanted $50 million for a simulated rain forest inserted into the energy bill. It was rejected, but later appeared in an omnibus spending bill. (AP Photo)
PART 1

Back-room dealing a Capitol trend

(By Susan Milligan, Globe Staff)
With one party controlling the White House and Congress, the House leadership is changing the way laws are made in America, favoring secrecy and speed over open debate and negotiation.
PART 2

Energy bill a special-interests triumph

(By Susan Milligan, Globe Staff)
The energy bill has become a phonebook-sized symbol of modern Washington lawmaking, in which policy is driven by those who have money, power, and access to a relatively small group of decision-makers.
PART 3

Medicare bill a study in D.C. spoils

(By Christopher Rowland, Globe Staff)
The Washington spoils system went into overdrive as lawmakers sought to build support for the Medicare prescription drug benefit while taking care of their home states and special-interest groups.
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