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English scientist Charles Darwin (above) produced the scientific theory of evolution in his 1859 book 'The Origin of Species.'
English scientist Charles Darwin (above) produced the scientific theory of evolution in his 1859 book "The Origin of Species." (Globe File Photo)

Recent discoveries of how genes interact are changing how we view evolution

To understand one of the latest theories in evolution, one needs to consider the ''Iron Chef" television show, where dueling chefs are given the same ingredient, but use it to produce wildly different results. (By Gareth Cook, Boston Globe)

Catholic scientist has faith
in both God and evolution

In court, in classrooms, and on late-night cable television, cell biologist and practicing Catholic Kenneth R. Miller defends evolution. (By Carolyn Y. Johnson, Boston Globe)

Darwin on display

Charles Darwin, the father of evolutionary theory, was born to pious parents and raised a creationist. Stubborn and strong-headed, he hated school and did poorly, leading his despairing father to deride him as a dilettante who cared only for ''shooting, dogs, and rat catching." (By Ellen Ruppel Shell, Boston Globe)

A Darwinian view of AIDS

By exploring how humans evolve to win the battle with diseases and how they are sometimes vanquished by those pathogens, scientists hope to find drugs that can mimic successes and stave off the worst that viruses and bacteria can produce. (By Stephen Smith, Boston Globe)
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