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The 1913 law

History suggests race was the basis

By Scott S. Greenberger
Globe Staff / May 21, 2004

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What was state Senator Harry Ney Stearns thinking? On March 7, 1913, the 38-year-old, Harvard-educated lawyer from Cambridge persuaded his Senate colleagues -- future president Calvin Coolidge among them -- to approve Senate Bill 234. Simply put, the measure barred out-of-state residents from getting married in Massachusetts if their union would be illegal in their home state. Democratic Governor Eugene ... (Full Article: 546 Words)

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