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Ali Maschan Moesa, an official of Indonesia’s most powerful Islamist group, says: ‘‘Religion needs the state, and the state needs religion, but the relationship should not be too close.’’
Ali Maschan Moesa, an official of Indonesia’s most powerful Islamist group, says: ‘‘Religion needs the state, and the state needs religion, but the relationship should not be too close.’’ (Globe Staff Photos / Charles A. Radin)
Lena Rachmawati (R) and Ninikrohmawati, both 15, are students at a moderate Indonesian school.
Lena Rachmawati (R) and Ninikrohmawati, both 15, are students at a moderate Indonesian school.
part 1

Two visions of faith collide

(By Charles A. Radin, Globe Staff, 5/8/05)
NORTHWEST PUNJAB PROVINCE, Pakistan Malik Sameen, governor of the Punjab's Attock subdistrict, is on his way to a Muslim religious festival deep in the countryside. Grasping the steering wheel loosely with his right hand, he gestures out the window with his left, enthusiastically pointing out the rich villages and the poor, the old, and the new.
part 2

Conflict hits Indonesia hard

(By Charles A. Radin, Globe Staff, 5/9/05)
PEMOGON, Indonesia The men were marked as outsiders and Islamic fundamentalists by their untrimmed beards and long, flowing robes. They arrived, one or two at a time, in the summer of 2002, preaching, trading, selling rolls and sandwiches in this quiet village on the working-class side of Bali, where Muslims coexist placidly with Hindus, Buddhists, and animists.
part 3

Western-style democracy proves to be a tough sell

(By Charles A. Radin, Globe Staff)
Last in a series CAIRO -- Baradi, the coffee shop at the corner of Tahrir and Dokki streets, is typical of thousands of cafes in this largest and most moderate of Arab Muslim cities.
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