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Jack Meagher (left) and Arthur Roberts at Sea View Retreat in Rowley, which made the biggest improvement between 2002 and 2004 in rankings of Massachusetts nursing homes.
Jack Meagher (left) and Arthur Roberts at Sea View Retreat in Rowley, which made the biggest improvement between 2002 and 2004 in rankings of Massachusetts nursing homes. (Globe Staff Photo / Michele McDonald)

Nursing homes show uneven gains

(By Alice Dembner and Bill Dedman, Globe Staff and Globe Correspondent, 12/13/04)
Two years after the Bush administration began publicly grading nursing homes in an effort to improve quality, a Boston Globe analysis of federal records indicates progress in some areas of patient care, but no gains in others.
 Substandard homes often allowed to keep operating (By Alice Dembner, Globe Staff, 12/13/04)
 REGION: Nursing homes fight back (By Franco Ordoez, Globe Staff, 12/19/04)
graphics and charts
Pop-up The extremes in Mass.
Each home's performance on each of eight quality measures was ranked relative to other Mass. homes. Then the rankings for each home were averaged and compared with the averages for other homes.
Mass. nursing homes
In November 2002, the Bush administration began posting quality scores all nursing homes, showing the percentage of residents suffering from problems.
Pop-up Choosing a facility
The following resources may be helpful in selecting a nursing home. Advocates say the most important step is to visit the home at different times of day, observe the care, and speak with residents.
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