When You Tweet Something Funny, It Can Really Pay Off

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People holding mobile phones are silhouetted against a backdrop projected with the Twitter logo in this illustration picture taken in Warsaw . –REUTERS

When ordinary Boston dude Chris Scott sent his tweet to about 1,000 followers, he probably expected a handful of retweets and favorites at most.

It read: “Oh hi Becky who refused to kiss me during spin the bottle in 6th grade & now wants to play “FarmVille,’’ looks like tables have f—ing turned.’’ (Farmville is a game on Facebook that encourages players to invite their friends to join in on some virtual farming fun.)

Business Insider reports that Scott said he quickly forgot about the tweet, but a few months later, the unthinkable happened:

The tweet has been retweeted over 18,000 times, plagiarized by dozens, and Scott, 30, was even accused by a widely followed comedian of stealing the joke from an MTV show called “Guy Code,’’ a program Scott had never heard of or seen.

Scott told Insider “The Becky Tweet’’ received its second life because a well-known Twitter comedian Mary Charlene had retweeted the tweet to her 160,000 followers.

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Scott later found out the tweet had even been screengrabbed and posted on Imgur, an online image hosting service, and Tumblr with over 100,000 shares.

What’s perhaps the funniest part of “The Becky Tweet’’ phenomenon?

The fact that SO many people tried to plagiarize it.

Insider reports:

If you run a Twitter search of “kiss tables turned’’ instead of “Oh hi Becky,’’ you’ll see lots of folks that swapped in different names like Lisa, Travis, Jill, Mike. People change 6th grade to 5th or 7th. Change “Farmville’’ to “Candy Crush.

(Have the posers no shame?)

Scott’s legendary tweet now has roughly 20,000 retweets and has been faved 30,000 times.

Scott’s story should serve as a reminder to think before you tweet: You never know what might happen. (Especially if your tweet just happens to be hilarious.)

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