THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Rakan Hassan, 12, got a lift from nurse Karen McDonough to the playroom on the 18th floor of Massachusetts General Hospital. He spent two weeks at MGH being treated for wounds suffered when US soldiers opened fire on the family car in Iraq, killing his parents. With them is Aomar Nait-Talb, a MGH employee from Morocco who speaks Arabic. Nait-Talb volunteered as a translator and became Rakan's friend.

Rakan's war

This is a story about a boy, and a war. About hatred and healing, pain and longing. About redemption, or the dream of it. About going home, even when home is just about the most dangerous place on earth. But mostly it's about a boy. His name is Rakan. He is 12 years old. He got shot in Iraq. And for five months, a medical team in Boston tried to put him back together again.

By Kevin Cullen
Globe Staff / February 26, 2006

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Click the play button above for an audio slideshow narrated by Globe reporter Kevin Cullen On Jan. 18, 2005, as dusk fell in Tal Afar, a scruffy city in northwest Iraq, Rakan Hassan was riding in the family car, heading home after visiting his uncle. His father, Hussein Hassan, a clerk in the local electricity office, was driving faster than ... (Full article: 2888 words)

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