epa04134706 A Malaysian Airlines aircraft takes off at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia, 21 March 2014. An international posse of ships and planes led by Australia braved atrocious weather on 20 March to scour a 23,000-square-kilometer patch of the southern Indian Ocean for possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines jet. Marker buoys that could pick up any bleeps from the black box on flight MH370 have been dropped in the search area around 2,500 kilometres south-west of Perth, Australia, where satellite imagery showed floating objects that could be parts of the fuselage from the lost Boeing 777-200. EPA/AHMAD YUSNI
A Malaysian Airlines aircraft takes off at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia, on Mar. 21, 2014. An international posse of ships and planes led by Australia braved atrocious weather in a patch of the southern Indian Ocean for possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines jet.
Ahmad Yuni/EPA

The Telegraph is reporting that it has obtained the final 54 minutes of communication records from missing Malaysia Flight 370.

As the search continues for possible wreckage of the aircraft in the southern Indian Ocean, the transcript marks a further piece of evidence in the baffling mystery of flight MH370. It shows that -- according to numerous experts-- the two-way banter between Fariq Abdul Hamid, the co-pilot, and air traffic controllers was "perfectly routine."

The report focuses on two parts of the communication. During one portion, a message from the cockpit repeats that they were cruising at 35,000 feet. In another portion, the plane lost contact and changed direction just as there was a changeover among air traffic controllers, according to the UK paper.

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But the run of messages between MH370 and the ground involved routine calls between the cockpit and air traffic controllers and gives no hint of the drama that was to follow. It is believed Hamid, as co-pilot, was the sole communicator.

An international search effort is underway to find the missing jetliner. There were 12 crew members and 227 passengers on board when the Boeing 777 lost contact on March 8. This week, the search has focused on a remote area of the Indian Ocean after two large objects, possibly debris, were spotted by a satellite.