New Hampshire native James Foley will unfortunately be remembered by many as the photojournalist beheaded by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Video of the execution was released yesterday, and was met with revulsion and anger around the world.

Closer to home, friends, colleagues and family members shared their stories of Foley’s compassion, bravery and determination, offering the world a truer version of who he was and how he should be remembered.

The Boston Globe reports:

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On April 5, 2011, forces loyal to Moammar Khadafy detained Mr. Foley and two other journalists, and they spent 44 days in Libyan prisons. Clare Morgana Gillis, held captive with Mr. Foley, wrote about the experience in an essay posted May 1, 2013, on the Syria Deeply website.

“We shared a cell for two and a half weeks,” she wrote, “and every day he came up with lists for us to talk through. Top 10 movies. Favorite books. The fall of the Roman Empire and the rebirth of Western civilization. Which famous person would you most like to meet? What’s your life story? How does war change you? How can we be better people when we get out of here? When I was in tears after a six-hour interrogation that ended at sunrise, he observed matter-of-factly, ‘It’s their job to break you. They did it to you today, and they’ll do it to me tomorrow. Get some sleep.’ ”

Click here to read the full Boston Globe report.