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Greece reaches long-delayed deal on bailout loans

School guards protesting job cuts hung banners from Athens City Hall Tuesday that said “No to layoffs.” They are among the public sector workers facing cuts by the government.
School guards protesting job cuts hung banners from Athens City Hall Tuesday that said “No to layoffs.” They are among the public sector workers facing cuts by the government.Thanassis Stavrajus/Associated press

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ATHENS — Greece concluded seven months of tortuous negotiations with its international debt inspectors Tuesday, reaching a deal that will allow it to access a long-delayed rescue loan installment.

The deal does not require Greece to impose any new austerity policies, Prime Minister Antonis Samaras insisted, as he outlined a series of relief measures for the most needy.

‘‘Today a long period of tribulations has ended, and a new beginning is being made,’’ Samaras said.

Greece has depended on its bailout from other European countries and the International Monetary Fund since mid-2010. Payment of the rescue loans depend on the country meeting criteria in spending cuts, tax increases and reforms. Greece’s progress in meeting the targets is reviewed regularly by the debt inspectors, collectively known as the “troika.”

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