The Obama and Romney campaigns exuded confidence on Sunday, each claiming to be poised for victory two days before the election.

“When I look at the intensity numbers, when I look at being on the road for three days with Governor Romney and the crowds, when I look at the undecideds, I believe that Governor Romney will not only win on Tuesday, I believe he could win decisively,” Ed Gillespie, a Romney campaign adviser, said on ABC’s “This Week.”

“Listen,” David Plouffe, a White House adviser, said on the same program, “we’re confident the president has the electoral votes to win this if we get our vote out, and that’s what we’re focused on in the next two days.”

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Nationally, the race for the White House is a dead heat. An ABC News/Washington Post poll published on Sunday showed Obama and Romney tied at 48 percent. An NBC News/Wall Street Journal survey, also released on Sunday, gave Obama a 1-point lead, 48 percent to 47 percent, well within the survey’s margin of error.

Most battleground state polls favor Obama but some are by shrinking margins. The Obama campaign argues the president’s leads bode well for his reelection; the Romney campaign contends recent movement toward the Republican ticket indicates a GOP win.

In all-important Ohio, Obama leads Romney, 50 percent to 48 percent, according to a Columbus Dispatch poll released on Sunday. An average of recent polls in the Buckeye State, tabulated by the website RealClearPolitics, shows the president up by 2.8 points

Some surveys suggest Obama’s leads have disappeared altogether.

In New Hampshire, for instance, a WMUR poll published on Saturday showed Obama and Romney tied at 47 percent. The president led by 15 points in the same poll in early October.

In Pennsylvania, a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review poll released on Sunday also showed a 47-47 draw. Multiple polls had Obama’s advantage at or near double digits in Pennsylvania in late September.

The RealClearPolitics averages still put Obama up by 3.9 points in the Keystone State and 1.5 points in the Granite State.

Florida also remains tight, with most polls showing a slight edge for Romney.

“When you talk about Florida, for them to go down and spend more money there is a little bit like Barack Obama’s government right now—that they just want to throw money at the problem and hope it fixes it,” Rich Beeson, the Romney campaign’s political director, said on “Fox News Sunday.” “But at the end of the day, Governor Romney is going to carry Florida by a significant margin.”

David Axelrod, the Obama campaign’s senior adviser, countered by pointing to the NBC/Wall Street Journal poll, which gave the president a 2-point edge in Florida.

“We feel very competitive in the state of Florida,” Axelrod said on “Fox News Sunday.”