Lieutenant Governor Tim Murray, whose aspirations for the corner office are well-known, demurred on his timetable for announcing a candidacy for governor today while acknowledging the obvious: “I would like to be governor.”

Later, Murray told reporters that he would look at the opportunity and that his decision would be a personal one.

“I’ve been around the state more than anybody perhaps other than the governor the last 6 years,” he said. “I know the issues. I know the people. I know the challenges. And I know the opportunities. I’m not going to rush into anything. I’m going to make my decision in due course.”

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Still, the remarks he presented at the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce breakfast at the InterContinental Boston sounded much like a campaign speech.

Murray, a former mayor of Worcester and Governor Deval Patrick’s second-in-command since 2007, touted the accomplishments of the Patrick administration and the role he has played on issues such as housing and homelessness, veterans’ services, domestic violence, substance abuse, rail and freight, municipal issues, science technology, engineering and math education.

He pointed to “the workmanlike daily routine I was familiar with as mayor of the state’s second largest city; bringing constituencies together to meet common goals, whether it be to better the schools for Worcester’s 25,000 school children or implementing a $1 billion economic development plan.”

Observers had wondered whether Murray would seize the speaking engagement to get out in front of the pack of Massachusetts politicians interested in advancing to higher offices as the dominoes fall since this month’s election.

President Obama’s reelection opens the possibility that US Senator John F. Kerry will be nominated secretary of state or defense, opening a Senate seat in Massachusetts for the second time in years.

Murray basked in the speculation but declined to seize the moment.

“It’s funny, I read all these columns and listen to commentators lament, ‘we’re so happy that the campaign’s over,’ and then you want to start another one very soon,” Murray told reporters after his speech.

He added: “Listen, when opportunities present themselves you take a look at them and decide … what’s good for our family and what you think you have to offer and that process is one we’ll look at as opportunities present themselves.”