Massachusetts residents voted in record numbers earlier this month, state officials said today, despite predictions that President Obama’s race against Republican Mitt Romney—a former governor—would not generate as much enthusiasm as the Democrat’s initial run for the presidency.

Secretary of the State William F. Galvin said the Nov. 6 turnout was 3,184,196 people – or 73.3 percent of registered voters—compared with 3,102,995 people who voted in 2008, the previous record.

Turnout may have been boosted by the extensive ground efforts of the state’s dominant Democratic Party, which mobilized to help Elizabeth Warren defeat Senator Scott Brown in the nation’s most expensive Senate race.

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Galvin announced that two approved ballot questions, a medical marijuana law and a “right-to-repair” motor vehicle law, would take effect Jan. 1.

He said the Legislature may have to work on a right-to-repair law because lawmakers agreed before the election on a compromise measure that was supposed to make the voter initiative unnecessary. Nonetheless, voters passed a competing measure.

Galvin said the state’s representatives to the Electoral College will officially convene Dec. 17 to cast 11 electoral votes for Obama and his running mate, Vice President Joe Biden.