NYC Approves Condo Development with ‘Poor Door’

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Has luxury living finally gone too far?

According to the New York Post, a controversial plan by New York developer Extell to build a luxury condo complex with a separate entrance for lower-income residents was approved by the New York Department of Housing Preservation and Development on Monday.

The project would put a 33-story building in New York’s Upper West Side and plans to have 219 luxury units with waterfront views. The development includes 55 affordable housing units in a “building segment” facing the street.

The proposal was approved under the Inclusionary Housing Program, which allows developers to build larger properties as long as they also provide some on- or off-site low-income housing. For doing so, developers can receive generous tax breaks.

Affordable units will be available for families whose annual income is $51,540 or less. Residents of low-income units will not be allowed to use some of the more high-end amenities like the gym or swimming pool.

As can be expected, there was plenty of outcry over the “poor door” approval on Twitter:

However, New York Post columnist Steve Cuozzo points out that the separate entrance design is a legal requirement and is commonplace at other residential complexes.

, title=NYC Approves Condo Development with ‘Poor Door’ , formattedLastPubDate=July 22, 2014 1:52 PM}
July 22, 2014 1:52 PM

Has luxury living finally gone too far?

According to the New York Post, a controversial plan by New York developer Extell to build a luxury condo complex with a separate entrance for lower-income residents was approved by the New York Department of Housing Preservation and Development on Monday.

The project would put a 33-story building in New York’s Upper West Side and plans to have 219 luxury units with waterfront views. The development includes 55 affordable housing units in a “building segment” facing the street.

The proposal was approved under the Inclusionary Housing Program, which allows developers to build larger properties as long as they also provide some on- or off-site low-income housing. For doing so, developers can receive generous tax breaks.

Affordable units will be available for families whose annual income is $51,540 or less. Residents of low-income units will not be allowed to use some of the more high-end amenities like the gym or swimming pool.

As can be expected, there was plenty of outcry over the “poor door” approval on Twitter:

However, New York Post columnist Steve Cuozzo points out that the separate entrance design is a legal requirement and is commonplace at other residential complexes.

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