THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Community Snapshot

Malden

Email|Print|Single Page| Text size +
June 3, 2008

THE GOODS: Once a booming industrial center, Malden is making strides to shed its word at the edges image. An ambitious downtown redevelopment effort underway, with a focus on mixing chain retail stores and restaurants with local standbys. The real appeal of Malden, however, is the neighborhood feel for residents living in its five squares, coupled with its proximity to Boston. Few suburbs have greater ease of access to the city than Malden, with the centrally-located Orange line and commuter rail stop, bus service, and highways I-93 and Route 1. Many residents, however, don't have to trip into Boston for a night out, with a new crop of restaurants, bars and nightclubs now available. New developments are helping to ease pressure on the tax base, which has taken decades to recover from the loss of light manufacturing companies.

PROS: Stately Victorian homes combine with relatively new condominium construction to make the city a top choice for starter-home seekers and renovators. In between the two extremes is ample post-war housing stock, apartment complexes and a relatively strong commercial tax base. The trend is reflected in demographic data, which shows a spike in residents in their late 20s and early 30s.

CONS: Despite improvements in MCAS test scores, Malden's public schools continue to struggle with a high drop-out rate and low teachers' salaries and student attendance compared to other districts.

DAVE COPELAND

Median home price: Single family, $305,000; Condominiums, $270,000
Residential tax rate: $8.21
Average tax bill: $2,936 (2007)
Choice location: Pine Banks Park straddles the Malden-Melrose line, but most of the park's 107.5 acres lie in Malden. It has seven athletic fields, picnic areas and playgrounds, in addition a natural forest.
Cocktail party nugget: The Thanksgiving Day football rivalry between Malden and Medford high schools is the second-oldest continuous school sports rivalry in the United States, dating back to 1889.
SOURCES: The Warren Group, Massachusetts Department of Revenue, Commonwealth of Massachusetts Web site.

more stories like this

  • Email
  • Email
  • Print
  • Print
  • Single page
  • Single page
  • Reprints
  • Reprints
  • Share
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Comment
 
  • Share on DiggShare on Digg
  • Tag with Del.icio.us Save this article
  • powered by Del.icio.us
Your Name Your e-mail address (for return address purposes) E-mail address of recipients (separate multiple addresses with commas) Name and both e-mail fields are required.
Message (optional)
Disclaimer: Boston.com does not share this information or keep it permanently, as it is for the sole purpose of sending this one time e-mail.